Minimum Order : $35 + Shipping
0

Cart

No products in the cart.

Close
  • Minimum Order : $35 + Shipping
    • Order online or call 1.330.488.2973
    • Order Pond Plants, Fish &
      Accessories Online...It's Easy!
    • Login
    • Cart / $
      0
      0

      No products in the cart.

      • No products in the cart.

    • 0

      Cart

      No products in the cart.

     Although we can't complain about the winter we had this year mother nature is playing tricks on us again. Signs of spring and warm weather and now snow tomorrow??  What gives?

    While walking through the garden you can see signs of spring trying to emerge.   The fish in the pond will venture towards the water surface when the sun is beating down on them but when the air changes back to cold they hid.  Its been an unusually warm March and April than in the past.

    Mother Nature has a way of tricking even the most experienced water gardener. We finally have a week of warm temperatures, and things are coming alive in our ponds. After months of rain, sleet, snow and ice we are all ecstatic. Armed with our pond gloves, waders and nets, we set out to begin cleaning our ponds. Throwing in some MicrobeLift Spring & Summer, clean our filters and hope algae doesn't start to grow until we can get some plants in.  We check temperatures and think it is time to add some plants. Seems safe, after all the temperatures are rising. Place our orders, plants arrive and all seems well. Then out of nowhere (actually Canada), comes a cold front with freezing nighttime temperatures. We frantically remove our floating plants, new bog plants and place them in the garage or on the covered porch for the next couple of days.  Then, temperatures rise again and out the plants go again. We try our best to ship the plants when the time is right for planting in your planting zone. Unfortunately, we can not control Mother Nature and her unpredictable ways.   Just, remember when receiving new plants in the Spring to keep a watchful eye on the temperatures,  in case Mother Nature tries to play a trick on you!

     

     

    I can't say I dislike winter....when it snows everything looks so pretty but then this winter has been pretty nice so far.  Temperatures are in the 50s today and the SUN is shinning.  Unusual for January in Ohio.  The pond is frozen but only a thin layer and the fish aren't moving much although I can catch a glimpse of them sometimes.

     

    So while I continue to knit away the hours I keep thinking about spring.....changes to the pond.....new plants to offer.....what plants are thriving in the greenhouse. When the planting season ends things begin happening in the greenhouse.  With seedlings and dividing of plants there is alot of do to get ready for the following season.  Put on the gloves, play in the dirt,  then watch the plants begin to grow.

     It won't be long and most of us will begin the task of spring cleaning our ponds.  While there is still alot of activity in the warmer climates those of us in the north continue to wait.  Being a mild winter thus far only makes us more anxious for spring.

     

    Its officially fall now and we need to begin preparing our pond for the winter and hopefully a cleaner pond for spring.  I've listed a few maintenance tips to guide you through preparing your pond for the winter.  I still have a few flowers appearing in my pond but I think they are almost through blooming for the season 🙁

     

    FALL/WINTER POND MAINTENANCE TIPS

     1. Before winter arrives, you will want to make sure your pond and filtering system are clean to ensure good water quality throughout the winter months. With the arrival of fall it is wise to do a partial water change to remove any built up contaminants to improve water quality. Partial water changes need to be made before water temperatures fall below 60 degrees to minimize fish stress. Adding pond salt at this time will improve the slime coating of fish, to help them ward off disease and parasites.

    2. Before the leaves begin to fall, cover your pond with one of ourpond nets. The goal is to try and keep the pond as clean as possible for the winter months. Leaves will sink to the bottom of the pond and rot, causing excess carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. After the first frost, take out any floating plants, as these will begin to decay. Trim back hardy lilies and bog plants and place below the freeze line.

    3. Switch to Microbe-Lift Autumn/Winter Prep. This will help break down organic material in the pond before winter sets in. Microbe-Lift Autumn/Winter Prep helps accelerate the decomposition of leaves, scum, sediment and other organic matter during the fall and throughout the winter months. Also, Microbe-Lift Autumn/Winter Prep helps to maintain a healthy immune system for your fish during the winter months. Microbe-Lift Autumn/Winter Prep will help jump-start your pond to a healthier environment in the spring.

    4.Reduce your fish feeding as the water temperatures drop below 60 degrees. Start feeding your fish a couple of times a week. We recommend switching to a wheat germ based fish food formulated for fall and spring feeding. When water temperatures drop below 60 degrees, the metabolism of your fish slow down. Both Tetra-Pond Spring/Fall and Microbe-Lift Cold Weather fish food are highly digestible cool weather diets that are made with less protein, but contain wheat germ, which is easily digested. They also contain higher levels of fat, which help your fish survive their winter hibernation. When water temperatures reach 50 degrees, stop feeding your fish completely. Feeding at water temperatures below 50 degrees can possibly kill your fish. A pond thermometeris a must have.  This will help you in determining when to stop feeding your fish and will also help to know when to begin feeding your fish in the spring.  Its also a good idea to know your water temperature for those adding tropical pond plants to your pond in the spring.

    5.Adding Microbe-Lift Barley Straw Extract will help control string algae throughout the fall and winter months. Barley Straw Extract is an effective and eco-friendly way to reduce algae. Unlike algaecides, which are ineffective in water temperatures below 50 degrees, Microbe-Lift Barley Straw Extract will continue to control algae throughout the winter months.

    6.Before freezing temperatures begin, install a pond de-icer. Ponds covered with ice do not allow toxic gases to escape causing fish loss. A pond de-icer will keep a section of your pond open to allow oxygen and gas exchange.

    7.During the winter removing snow from the surface of the pond will help submerged plants and microscopic aquatic plants to continue to produce oxygen as long as light penetrates through the ice. Insufficient light, along with the decomposition of plant and leaf debris may result in insufficient oxygen for the fish, causing them to suffocate. Removing the snow from a portion of your surface area will reduce the likelihood of this occurring.

    Remember to add a tray of sand in your pond for the frogs to have a place to winter over.

     

    It won't be long and summer will be over.  I already notice a difference with the days getting shorter.  It has started to cool off some from the hot weather we've been having.  All is doing well in the pond and it won't be long and the garden will be finished.  I canned the first of the tomatoes last week ending up with about 27 quarts so far.  I'm sure tomorrow I'll be able to add to that.

    Finding more time now to do other things since the pond season is starting to slow down.  There is little time during March, April, May and June, but then July things start to slow some.  I notice the waterlilies seem to have to slowed down but when they do bloom are still wonderful.

    Enjoy why we can......the tropicals are the first to go.

     

    Its ice everywhere.....but at least its February so its almost over.   I will say its a pretty site but I still prefer the green color over the white!  I look outside and imagine pictures like this...

     

     

    The plants continue to grow nicely in the greenhouses and while standing in there you almost can forget what's going on outside.  Call it an escape from reality.  The marsh marigolds are starting to bloom alot and I must say they are really nice plants this year.

    The snow storm isn't over yet so we are all in a holding pattern....waiting on the next blast to come through.  Whether it will be ice or snow remains yet to be determined.  So I will continue to think of all the plants growing and start to update our store to share the plants with you that we will be offering this year. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Walked out to the pond the other morning, and there they were, a pair of Mallard Ducks! My first thought was, oh how pretty they are, and what a cute couple they make! I started to have visions of the nest they would build next to the pond, after that the family of ducklings would appear. It would be so wonderful to watch them grow up, learn to swim, follow their parents around and in the pond. Then the voice of reason came! Ducks are not really welcome visitors to your backyard water garden. Unfortunately, ducks make a mess. Their droppings add unwanted nutrients to your pond. Not to mention, they are vegetarian for the most part, and they will eat your plants. The same plants you have spent your money on, they will eat.  So, I listened to that voice of reason, scared the pair off, made them feel unwelcome and they have not been back since. I'm sure they have found one of the larger ponds or lakes in the area to call home.

    We had highs in the low to mid 80's the last couple of days here in Ohio.  One week snow, the next unseasonably warm. Don't want to get too used to it though, next week we will be back to the normal spring time temperatures. Normal here this time of year is mid 50's to mid 60's. Nothing like a few warm days though to get people out working on their ponds.  The weather has been on the unusual side. One week snow, the next record breaking high temperatures. It makes it very difficult to know when to ship plants. Many of the plants we sell are cold sensitive and trying to second guess Mother Nature is sometimes impossible! We have customers in the Pacific Northwest that are still freezing, the time has passed when we usually can start to send their plants. Old Man Winter just isn't moving out of that part of the country yet. Hopefully, things will start to warm up for them in the next week or two.  And for us in Ohio, we can only hope the milder temperatures will continue. We just want to remind everyone, just because you are having warm temperatures today, does not mean it is safe to put plants out before your last frost date. It has been such a long winter, I know everyone is a little impatient....I am too! But, always remember, Mother Nature likes to throw curve balls at us! Just when we think it is safe to put plants out, along comes a freeze warning!

    This is what some of us in the North woke up to this morning, and this was after some of it had melted.  What happened to those 50 and 60 degree days???  Hopefully they will be back again soon.  How can we get started cleaning our ponds and thinking putting those new plants in if the water is too cold to put our hand in it.  And what about those fish and frogs???? They are hiding again.

    Whenever this happens, those of us who wanted our plants shipped thinking its finally warm wonder, now what do I do with them.  Make sure you protect them by bringing them indoors until it warms up.  Remember most of the plants have been indoors in a greenhouse environment and shiver even when the temps are in the 60s.  But we need to make sure the water temperature have stabilized to 65 degrees before we put those floating plants out.  

    The floating water plants in your pond need to have the water temperature reach 65 degrees.  They will show signs of yellowing leaves and black spots on their leaves if left  in water temps below that.  The water lettuce will wilt and turn white if too cold.   We tend to get anxious in the spring and sometimes put floaters in before the water is warm enough.  Even the lotus and waterlilies need the warmer weather to start growing.  But at least those were outside all winter and were pulled to ship out. 

    Hopefully, like last year, this is a short spell and in a couple weeks things will turn around and we can once again start looking forward to enjoying our ponds.

    Those annoying predators.....the one we dislike the most when we have fish swimming about.  Some of our customers have had their ponds depleted of fish because of the blue heron!  They are beautiful birds but please stay away from our ponds.  You'd think they'd go for the larger ponds with more fish.

    Blue Herons are territorial. If they see another bird at your pond, they will simply move on to another pond for their next meal. Our life-like statue is decorative and will help keep other herons away. Just make sure you move it periodically, or the real birds get wise to the fact that it is fake!

    Unfortunately, our ponds exist outdoors and raccoons, blue herons and other wildlife are constantly visiting our piece of paradise. After all, they have to eat too! We have several products to help keep your fish, snails and frogs safe from becoming a gourmet meal for the local wildlife! We will be posting these products in the coming days or call us if you would like specific instruction on how best to deter the varmints attacking your fish!

    With spring here and hardly any coverage on our ponds it gives those predators a clear picture of our fish swimming about.  Until we can get some coverage to at least help in protecting our fish these items help.

    Check out the gator!

    cross